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Queen Mya Brazile Featured in New Mural at Portland International Airport

Rose Festival Queen Mya Brazile is one of the featured images in the new “Street Art” mural created by local artists Alex Chiu and Jeremy Nichols, for the north pedestrian tunnel at Portland International Airport. The Portland of Portland in partnership with the Portland Street Art Alliance, officially dedicated the work in a ceremony at the Port offices on Wednesday, November 13 at 9:30 a.m.

Queen Mya wore the Official Crown of Rosaria (rarely seen in public outside of the Coronation). She was joined by Rose Festival staff to attend the dedication, as everyone toured the mural that featured Mya’s larger than life image. The likeness — taken from her crowning moment in the 2019 Rose Festival Coronation ceremony — is one of many images which represent “diversity, family, sharing food and nature,” that can be appreciated by travelers as they come and go along the lengthy passage.

According to an October 9, 2019 release from the Port of Portland:
“The goal was to create a magical and fantastic landscape, inspired by the culture and spirit of Portland and to celebrate the people, history and natural wonders of the Pacific Northwest.” The Port says they also “saw this as an opportunity to celebrate an art style — Street Art — that is well established in Portland. The PDX mural is part of the Port of Portland’s broader Art Program, which maintains rotating exhibits throughout the airport terminal in addition to permanent art space at PDX and the Port headquarters.”

Read more about the PDX Art Program at:
https://pdxart.portofportland.online/

About the Artists:

Alex Chiu is a second-generation Chinese American who has two daughters, a 4-year-old and 10-month-old. His parents began their careers as accountants before transitioning to help other immigrant families start their own businesses. Chiu brings his own childhood experience growing up in the United States — combined with his hope for his daughters — to inform his art. As Chui said, “My art is about redefining what being American means. America is a nation of racial diversity, immigrants and refugees, different languages, different spiritual beliefs, and different cultural practices. I want to celebrate our differences. I want people to relinquish their fears of the “other.” My art is about breaking those barriers.”

Jeremy Nichols grew up traveling regularly between upstate New York and Tokyo – his birthplace and his family’s home country – all the while growing up in the suburbs of Ohio. Like many families with immigrant roots, the contrasting cultural atmospheres confused Nichols as a child – leading him to question where to really call home. Nichols brings this “outsider looking in” approach to his artwork, combining elements of design and nature to “depict the relationship, energy and juxtaposition between nature and culture. I try to present the viewer with a sense of how I feel and see the world around me.”